7000 years of Heiligenberg (English version)

The Heiligenberg

The Heiligenberg, with its two conspicuous peaks, rises above the mouth of the Neckar into the plains of the Rhine river. It belongs to the Odenwald mountain range. Apart from the north-eastern saddle to the “Zollstock”, it is almost entirely separate from the rest of the mountain range . Otherwise it has relatively steep flanks and thus has, over time, offered several advantages:

  • Important military and trade routes on land and sea could be controlled from here, in both north-south and east-west directions.
  • Those who settled on the peaks, which were treeless until the 19th century, had a vast view in all directions: to the north as far as Worms, to the west as far as the Palatinate Forest, to the south-west as far as Speyer, and to the south as far as the northern Black Forest and the Neckar valley to Schlierbach. Larger buildings on the summit were also seen from afar in the plain and also served as a point of reference.
  • Due to its relatively steep shape, it was easy to defend against attacks.
  • Large parts of the Heiligenberg are made of Bunter sandstone (Buntsandstein), which is easy to dismantle and use as building material.
  • The brown ore that is found in the Bunter sandstone (Buntsandstein) contributes to a measurably increased magnetism, which is perceived by sensitive people as pleasant and it has certainly contributed to the millennia-long use as a sacred place.
  • The only downside is the poverty found by the springs that are located higher up, only the “Bitterbrunnen” provides water regularly at higher altitudes, or (up until a few years ago) so does the “Zollstockbrunnen” which is not far away.
Heidelberg mit Heiligenberg 1654. Merian

Heidelberg mit Heiligenberg 1654. Merian

The mountain only got its name in the late Middle Ages, when St. Michael’s monastery was settled in the 13th century by monks from the Premonstratensian monastery of All Saints in the Black Forest. The mountain was henceforth called „mons omnium sanctorum“ or „Allerheiligenberg“, from which today’s short form is derived. In the Early and High Middle Ages it was called „Aberinesberg“ or „Aberinesburg“, which was also piously corrupted by the monks in texts to „Abrahamsberg“.

 

Neolithic to Urnfield Age

The oldest finds date from the Early Neolithic around 5000 BC. They are shards of vessels from band ceramics, however they do not provide conclusive evidence of a settlement. Shards of vessels from the Rössen culture, flint artifacts and arrowheads from the entire area of ​​the later inner Celtic wall suggest a settlement in the Middle Neolithic. In contrast, there are no finds from the Bronze Age, apart from those from the late phase of the Urnfield Culture around 1000 BC., which suggest an intensive settlement.

Funde des Neolithikums und der Bronzezeit © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Funde des Neolithikums und der Bronzezeit © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Celts

A rather intensive Celtic settlement can be archaeologically proven between 700 and 200/150 BC. It begins with a Celtic fortification and a “princely seat” along with numerous domestic dwellings  that probably start from the northern hilltop and possibly end with a late Celtic “oppidum” about 200 years before the turn of the era.

Visible findings in the area, some – unfortunately – few excavations and, above all, chance finds give a vague picture of the Celtic presence on the Heiligenberg.

Großer doppelkonischer Topf aus der Lantènezeit © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Großer doppelkonischer Topf aus der Lantènezeit © KMH (E. Kemmet)

In 1860 two circular  ramparts from a Celtic fortification were recognized. The ramparts ran concentrically around the two mountain tops with the inner rampart measuring 2.1 km and the outer rampart measuring 3.1 km (see map).

Later, around 400 residential platforms, which were hut spaces terraced into the slope, were found in this area. This makes the fortified settlement one of the largest Celtic structures in Baden-Württemberg. The ramparts are the collapsed remnants of a huge wood, stone and earth construction, a typical Celtic „post-slot wall“. This was confirmed by a teaching excavation in the summer of 2019.

Keltische Pfostenschlitzmauer © KMH (B. Pfeifroth/P. Marzolff).

Keltische Pfostenschlitzmauer © KMH (B. Pfeifroth/P. Marzolff).

(A part of the Celtic post-slot wall was reconstructed on the Donnersberg.)

Keltenmauer Donnersberg

Keltenmauer Donnersberg

The finds on the mountain show a fortified Celtic settlement on and around the northern tip, probably in direct succession to the Urnfield settlement there.

Arm- und Fußringe aus Bronze und wirbelförmige Perle (Frühlatène) © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Arm- und Fußringe aus Bronze und wirbelförmige Perle (Frühlatène) © KMH (E. Kemmet)

A summit shrine could have been located on the artificially extended hilltop – a long tradition of veneration at this point indicates this. Providing archaeological evidence of a prince’s seat and the corresponding housing development to the south was made impossible by the construction of the „Thingstätte“ during the Nazi era. On the southern hilltop, on the edge of the settlement, there is a 56 m deep shaft in the red sandstone, the so-called „Heidenloch„. Roman and medieval traces of expansion indicate the – unsuccessful – attempt to build a well or a water cistern here. The location of the place on the summit and the geology made it impossible for such a construction. Instead there are many indications for the existence of a Celtic sacrificial pit, as has been found elsewhere, even if not of the imposing depth of the Heidenloch.

At the end of the 19th century a life-sized head of a sandstone statue was discovered in the Bergheim district, not far from the Neckar. It shows, as we know today, a Celtic “prince” with the typical leaf crown and it probably comes from his (still) unknown burial mound.

Keltenkopf.Badisches Landesmuseum Karlsruhe. Foto: Thomas Goldschmidt

Keltenkopf.Badisches Landesmuseum Karlsruhe. Foto: Thomas Goldschmidt

Similar finds on the Glauberg in Hesse indicate cultural and economic connections between the two princely seats around 370 BC.

Fürst vom Glauberg

Fürst vom Glauberg

After all, the Celtic fortress on the Heiligenberg controlled the trade routes in the valley and on the Neckar with a connection to the Danube, and thus its inhabitants lived from trade and handicrafts. The discovery of two iron bars indicates this.

Keltische Eisenbarrenm Reste eines Gusstiegels, Eisenschlacken © KMH (R. Ajtai/VE.DO)

Keltische Eisenbarrenm Reste eines Gusstiegels, Eisenschlacken © KMH (R. Ajtai/VE.DO)

 

Eisendepotfund aus der Mittellatènezeit © KMH (R. Ajtai/VE.DO)

Eisendepotfund aus der Mittellatènezeit © KMH (R. Ajtai/VE.DO)

At the time of the “Celtic migration” (from 400 BC) the importance of the fortification as a power center on the lower Neckar waned, the population thinned out. Nevertheless, people settled within the ramparts, as evidence shows. It is possible that even around 200 BC there was a late Celtic city  on the mountain, an “oppidum”, which has (yet) to be proven by finds.

But no later than 100 BC the Celtic traces are lost, the remaining Celtic population merges with the Germanic immigrants, the Neckarsueben. What remains are the ramparts and the memory of the Celtic sanctuary on the northern crest. The remains of a Roman temple in the main nave of St. Michael’s Basilica, consecrated to Mercury (a syncretism of the Celtic god Visucius and the Germanic god Cimbranius) bear witness to this.

 

Romans

In the time of Emperor Vespasian (69-79 AD), a number of forts were built on the right bank of the Rhine in the so-called “Agri Decumates” or “Decumation Fields” in Germania Superior to protect not only this area but also the area towards the east along the Limes . The main town in our area was LOPODVNVM (Ladenburg), where a second castrum was laid out around this time and soon after the construction of a city and the construction of a large forum began. In Neuenheim a castrum was laid out and a Neckar bridge built, later a second fort followed, and around the year 200 a Neckar bridge on stone pillars was built.

Römerbrücke Neuenheim.KMH

Römerbrücke Neuenheim.KMH

The reason was the construction of a military road east of the Rhine from MOGONTIACVM (Mainz) via LOPODUNUM to AQVAE (Baden-Baden) and ARGENTORATE (Strasbourg), with another junction also to AVGVSTA VENDILICORVM (Augsburg). In addition to the military camp in Neuenheim, small civilian settlements emerged, in which handicraft businesses with brick and ceramic production were predominant. An extensive burial ground has been proven.

A holy district was laid out on the Heiligenberg in the 2nd half of the 1st century.

Römischer heiliger Bezirk (Rekonstruktion)

Römischer heiliger Bezirk (Rekonstruktion)

The center and most important building was a Temple of Mercury. In the central nave of St. Michael’s Basilica dark stones indicate its outlines. A north-facing rectangular hall with an apse was painted brightly on the outside with a red line of grouting, on the inside it was clad with painted plaster, red porphyry and white marble.

Merkurtempel (Rekonstruktion) © KMH (B. Pfeifroth:P. Marzolff)

Merkurtempel (Rekonstruktion) © KMH (B. Pfeifroth:P. Marzolff)

Through dedicatory inscriptions in stone and votive tablets, we know that a MERCVRIVS CIMBRIANUS or MERCVRIVS VISVCIVS was venerated here, i.e. that here, in the sense of the Interpretatio Romana, the Roman god was seen to be equal with a Germanic or Celtic god.

Weiheinschrift für Merkur Cimbrianus © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Weiheinschrift für Merkur Cimbrianus © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Rekonstruktion eines silbernes Votivblechs aus dem Merkurtempel © KMH (R. Dale)

Rekonstruktion eines silbernes Votivblechs aus dem Merkurtempel © KMH (R. Dale)

 

Silberne Votivbleche für Merkur © KMH (R. Ajtai/VE.DO)

Silberne Votivbleche für Merkur © KMH (R. Ajtai/VE.DO)

Remains of two giant columns of Jupiter were also found as well as references to other sanctuaries and smaller buildings.

 

 

Jupitergigantensäule © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Jupitergigantensäule © KMH (E. Kemmet)

From the year 260, the Roman presence ended with the Alamanni invasions, when the area on the right bank of the Rhine had to be largely abandoned.

 

Francs

From the time of the Migration Period there are few finds that prove that the holy mountain was still being climbed. It is likely that the sanctuary was plundered after Roman times. After the Christianization of the Alemanni in the 5th century, who were predominant in our area, the still preserved Temple of Mercury on the Heiligenberg was rededicated into a Christian church, which was probably consecrated to the Archangel Michael from the beginning. Even if the god of traders and pickpockets and the biblical dragon slayer seem to have little in common, there are also surprising similarities. Like Michael, the god Hermes / Mercury is a feathered messenger of the gods, and the Greeks also call him the “Psychpombós”, the companion of the deceased souls via the Styx into Hades. And Michael is also considered a soul companion after death. If we take note of the fact that graves from all times for 3000 years – except the Roman period, but particularly intensively in the Merovingian-Franconian phase – have been found on the Heiligenberg, then this commonality of the two mountain patron saints fits well with the place.

During the Franconian era, a royal castle was built on the Heiligenberg – probably in connection with the Franconian royal court in Ladenburg – some buildings from this period have been archaeologically proven, including a mighty tower with massive masonry – a kind of keep, as found on later castles, or a residential tower – in the area of ​​the later enclosure. Remnants of the old Celtic walls were probably also used to secure the complex, because mortar-walled chamber gates were discovered in two places, as they are known elsewhere from the Carolingian period. Fortification walls from the time of the royal castle can still be seen on the westernmost edge of Paradise.

Fränkische Burg (Rekonstruktion) © KMH (B. Pfeifroth/P. Marzolff)

Fränkische Burg (Rekonstruktion) © KMH (B. Pfeifroth/P. Marzolff)

On this fortress, now called Aberinesberg or -burg, a branch of the Frankish imperial monastery Lorsch was set up in the 2nd half of the 9th century. Lorsch had many possessions around the Heiligenberg, and so it was only logical that it were located there with a few monks in order to better manage its goods and income. (Almost all the villages around Heidelberg, today mostly suburbs, have their first documentary mention in the 8th century, collected and recorded in the Lorsch Codex in the 12th century.) And the Lorsch abbot Thiotroch had a new St. Michael’s Church built on the mountain around 870 (now the patronage is documented), which had parts of the Roman walls included in the construction.

Mögliche Rekonstruktion St Michael im 10. Jh. v.Moers-Messmer 1987

St Michael im 10. Jh. v.Moers-Messmer 1987

This resulted in a coexistence of royal and monastic presence on the mountain. Then in 882 King Ludwig III. donated the Aberinesburg to Lorsch Abbey.

 

Benedictine / Premonstratensian

We can also assume that there were no monastery buildings in the sense of a cloistered monastery, but that the monks probably lived in the buildings of the castle. Since the branch of Lorsch on the Heiligenberg also received the associated property with the donation, there was a lot of money, and so St Michael’s Church was rebuilt many times during the 9th and 10th  century, at the end (around the year 1000) stood a three-aisled basilica with a transept and three choir apses. A west crypt was installed as a base to statically secure the mighty westwork and its two towers on westward sloping ground.

In 1023, Emperor Heinrich II granted the Lorsch abbot Reginbald, the later builder and bishop of the Speyer Cathedral, permission to build a regular monastery on the Heiligenberg. Apart from the choir and the east crypt, the previous church was removed and rebuilt with larger dimensions as a three-aisled basilica. According to the Lorsch Chronicle, it was splendidly furnished, and the luxury of the two (!) generous stair towers still demonstrates today that there were obviously considerable funds available here. In order to statically secure the mighty westwork with its two towers on the westward sloping ground, a west crypt was installed as a base.

Archivolte eines mittelalterlichen Schmuckportals aus dem Kloster © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Archivolte eines mittelalterlichen Schmuckportals aus dem Kloster © KMH (E. Kemmet)

In the west, a paradise or atrium called forecourt was built, but it was rebuilt many times over the next few centuries and mainly used as the cemetery of the monastery. The enclosure, the living and working area of ​​the monks, was not built beside the church as in most of the monasteries but, because of the structure of the terrain, in the east of the church. The monks were Benedictines, the Monastery of St. Michael remained a branch monastery of Lorsch, so it was not led by an abbot, but by a provost. Merian’s depiction from the 16th century shows a crossing tower, which was perhaps added later and was not a bell tower. It probably stood next to the northern chorus apse, and also only dates back to the 15th century.

St. Michael von Südwest. Hoffmann

St. Michael von Südwest. Hoffmann

In 1069 the former abbot Friedrich von Hirsau was accepted into the monastery. According to tradition, he was a particularly pious cleric who was recalled from his office by the lord of the monastery, the Count of Calw, due to an intrigue in the local monastery. In order to spare him the shame of having to continue to live in Hirsau under these circumstances, the Lorsch abbot Uldarich arranged a kind of retirement home for him in St. Michael’s monastery. However, he died in 1070, and was loved in the surrounding villages because of his charity. Legends of light and angelic appearances surround his death, and to this day Friedrich von Hirsau is a venerated saint in the Diocese of Speyer, although never canonized by the church as such. With great certainty he found his final resting place in the grave dug into the rock in the middle of the east crypt, which became a place of pilgrimage, especially on May 8th. Even today you can often find a bouquet of flowers on the grave plate, which was renewed because the grave was destroyed in the 19th century.

Around 1090 Arnold, a Benedictine monk, built a hermitage and an oratory (small chapel) on the front summit. About 4 years later, with the support of the Lorsch abbot Anshelm, another smaller branch monastery was founded at this point, the remains of which can now be seen as ruins. It was consecrated to St. Stephen and later also to St. Laurentius.

Stephanskloster (Rekonstruktion nach v. Moers-Messmer)

Stephanskloster (Rekonstruktion nach v. Moers-Messmer)

A knight from Handschuhsheim named Rifrid did not only attest witness to the monastery deed of foundation, he probably also bequeathed part of his fortune to the monastery. In 1932 a tombstone was found with a Latin inscription saying that Rifrid’s wife or widow wishes to be buried here (in the monastery) and that she shall bequeath her property to the monastery on the condition that the monks preserve her memory. The date of death is given as December 23rd without a year. A copy of the gravestone, the original of which is in the Kurpfälzisches Museum, can be seen today in the western part of St. Stephen’s Church. (This tombstone is the oldest post-antique written testimony that was found on Heidelberg soil.) Statements in the Lorsch Chronicle insinuate that Rifrid moved to the Holy Land with the first crusade in 1096 and probably did not return.

Grabplatte der Hazecha aus St. Stephan © KMH (P. Pfeifroth / T. Schöneweis)

Grabplatte der Hazecha aus St. Stephan © KMH (P. Pfeifroth / T. Schöneweis)

Abbot Anshelm was also buried in St. Stephan in 1101. On the day of his death, June 25, a procession moved from Handschuhsheim to the monastery. The name has been retained from the processional path, distorted into „Amselgasse“. His grave could not be found.

In the 13th century, Lorsch lost its dominant position, at the instigation of the Archbishop of Mainz its immunity was lifted, the Benedictines had to leave Lorsch and were replaced in 1245 by Premonstratensian Canons from the Black Forest monastery of All Saints, who some time later also took over the St. Michael branch. The Heiligenberg, which thenceforth received its current name („Allerheiligenberg“), belonged from then on to the office of Schauenburg, which was under the supervision of Mainz.

 

That only changed in 1460 with the victory of Elector Frederick the Victorious near Pfeddersheim in the Mainz Diocesan Feud (Stiftsfehde), which brought the office of Schauenburg and thus Heiligenberg into the control of the Electoral Palatinate.

Under the Premonstratensians there were some renovations in the church and monastery. Early Gothic windows were inserted into the apses, part of the cloister was later equipped with Gothic tracery windows. Apart from the calefactorium, other rooms were then also equipped with heating facilities, and tiles from a luxurious stove were discovered. During the time of the Premonstratensians, the monastery increasingly became a center of pilgrimage.

In addition to the two aforementioned processions on the Heiligenberg, two others have passed down to us over time . A hall procession called „Rolloss“, which reminds of a path name in Handschuhsheim, would take place on the Monday of the 6th week before Easter and it probably dated back to old pagan fertility rites. It can be assumed that things were quite rough on these occasions, so much so that in 1423 the Heidelberg University forbade those who belonged to the institution to participate and would punish by fine if they so did. Since the Premonstratensian period there has been a procession on the eve of All Saints‘ Day, that is on October 31st, in which the elector also used to take part and with which there was a fair on the site north of the monastery.

In the 15th century, the monasteries on the Heiligenberg seem to begin to decline, and the number of monks also decreased. According to a report to the Elector in 1503 the bell tower collapsed one night and killed three monks in their dormitory. The tower had previously been damaged by an earthquake in 1474. In 1537 we learned from Micyllus, who was a humanist from Heidelberg, that he had already found a ruin on the rear mountain peak. Until the middle of the 16th century, the St. Stephen’s Monastery seems to have been inhabited by a few or, at the very least, one monk („Brother Moritz“).

Heidenloch und Michaelskloster. Merian 1645

Heidenloch und Michaelskloster. Merian 1645

 

The Age of the Ruins

“You green mountain, you with two peaks

Like Parnasso, you high rock, with you

I wish to stay in peace for and for … „

This is how the baroque poet Martin Opitz, who was a student in Heidelberg around 1620, describes the Heiligenberg in a sonnet and compares it to Mount Parnassus, the Mountain of the Muses.

Meanwhile, the mountain has become more fascinating because of its nature and extraordinary shape, and its long history of settlement and worship of higher powers is becoming increasingly forgotten. In an engraving by Matthias Merian from 1645, the Monastery of St. Michael can still be seen as an impressive ruin despite the fact that it was given to the University of Heidelberg as a quarry. It seemed to have defied total decay for over a hundred years since its first mention as a ruin (1537).

However, archaeological looting and excessive stone robbery caused by the reconstruction of the war-torn villages at the foot of the mountain after the Palatine-French War of Succession (from 1689), soon only left the foundations of the two monasteries which too gradually became overgrown.

Die Türme des Klosters als Steinbruch nach einer Zeichnung von Ph. Förster 1830

Die Türme des Klosters als Steinbruch (nach einer Zeichnung von Ph. Förster 1830)

What remains is a mysterious memory of „pagan“ and medieval antiquities that moved the romantic Victor Hugo to visit the mountain at night on his trip to Germany in 1840.

Ruine des Michaelsklosters 1814 (Stahlstich von de Graimberg) © KMH

Ruine des Michaelsklosters 1814 (Stahlstich von de Graimberg) © KMH

People only began to be interested in the history of the mountain from 1860, when Julius Näher discovered the ramparts and – initially – declared them to be „Germanic“. The newly awakened interest in the prehistory of Heiligenberg certainly has something to do with the unification and nation-building of Germany. This explains why from 1886 (Wilhelm Schleuning) until the 1930s (Carl Koch) excavations took place at the monasteries and the ramparts. The city of Heidelberg, owner of the Heiligenberg since 1903 through the incorporation of the village of Handschuhsheim, showed great interest in the research at the time. Between 1910 and 1920 the painter Heinrich Hoffmann frequently went to the mountain and created meticulous drawings of the ruins. As a result he reconstructed the – possible – historical condition with a pencil, which has today become a valuable source of images.

The construction of the observation tower and its stones (1885) in the middle of the ruins of the St. Stephan monastery can only be regretted today. However, even worse is the construction of the “Thingstätte” which was placed in the middle of the Celtic settlement area by the “Reichsarbeitsdienst” (Reich Labour Service) in 1934/35. This destroyed several historical layers that cannot be restored. The replica of an ancient theater, designed for 15,000 visitors and intended by the Germanophile Thing Movement for German-national propaganda purposes, no longer fitted into the agenda of the National Socialists in 1937. Initially it was renamed into „Feierstätte“ (which roughly translates to Celebration Centre) – but thereafter it simply became useless!

It is only from 1950 onwards that the archaeologist, Berndmark Heukemes, reminds us of the historical importance of the mountain. It was he who founded the „Schutzgemeinschaft Heiligenberg“ in 1973 in order to preserve the monuments. He also initiated a chain of explorations and repairs: A refuge was built above the Heidenloch, the ruins of both the St. Stephan (Bert Burger 1996) and St. Michael (Peter Marzolff from 1980) monasteries are being restored and partially reconstructed, so are the two west towers and the west crypt.

The reason for thorough repairs and archaeological research in St. Michael was the continuing decline of the ruins of the two western towers. As a Heidelberg archaeologist and above all as chairman of the Heiligenberg Protection Association, Berndmark Heukemes decided to sound the alarm. He succeeded in getting the city of Heidelberg, the University and the State of Baden-Württemberg on board and providing two million DM so that between 1978 and 1984 the entire ruins of St. Michaels Monastery could be restored and also partially archaeologically examined. Under the direction of the architect Bert Burger, the stumps of the two west towers were renovated and made accessible. The west crypt – up until then a hole filled with rubble – had vaults recreated which were reminiscent of those from around 1200. In the cloister wing wall sections were added in the historically correct sense and incorrect reconstructions made by the Labor Service in the 1930s were eliminated.

The excavations carried out by Peter Marzolff – Institute for Prehistory and Protohistory from the University of Heidelberg – in selected parts of the complex yielded surprising new findings: the foundation walls of a Roman temple of Mercury with the apse facing north were exposed under the floor of the central nave. The previously suspected existence of a Roman peak sanctuary was thus archaeologically confirmed. Today the layout of the temple is marked by cobblestones in the monastery church. The efforts of the Schutzgemeinschaft  to seriously take care of the preservation of the ruins were thus crowned with success. Since the secured ruins still have to be regularly maintained and repaired, the Schutzgemeinschaft subsidizes the work that has to be done in line with its purpose.

Ausgrabung in der Kirche. Foto: Institut für Ur- und Frühgeschichte Universität Heidelberg

Ausgrabung in der Kirche. Foto: Institut für Ur- und Frühgeschichte Universität Heidelberg

In a similar fashion, a small scale educational excavation was financed together with the Kurpfälzisches Museum Heidelberg, the Working Group for Archeology in Baden and the State Monuments Office. (Schöneweiß 2019). This excavation has proven the construction of the inner circular wall as a Celtic post-slot wall and this has led to an interest in doing a more extensive excavation. There are many questions about the Celtic history of the mountain that are still unanswered.

By the way, since 1996 the “Celtic Path”, with its display boards, has connected the historical sites. Hikers and visitors can find a relaxing break on the saddle between the two mountain tops – near the large parking lot – in the „Waldschenke“ restaurant, which has been in existence since 1929.

 

The Heiligenberg as a “Holy Place”

One of the special features of the Heiligenberg is that we can assume that it was continuously used as a mountain sanctuary dating, at least, as far back as the Celtic settlement all the way up to the end of the monastery era – albeit with short interruptions. On this basis, the question to be examined is whether there was a special religious theme that connected the sanctuaries of the various cultural epochs with one another, i.e. a continuum in terms of content. It is certain that a sanctuary, in some form or another, also belonged to a prince’s seat

The archaeologically oldest evidence of a sanctuary on the Heiligenberg is given by the remains of the Celtic settlement between the 5th and 3rd centuries BC. After the Celtic head found in Bergheim could be interpreted as part of a grave figure of a Celtic „prince“ analogous to the monumental figure on the Glauberg, it could be concluded that there was a „princely seat“ on the rear summit of the Heiligenberg in the 5th century. It is certain that a sanctuary, in some form or another, belonged to a prince’s seat. After all, there are 2 things that archaeologically prove this on the Heiligenberg:

  • When the area of ​​the Roman Temple of Mercury was uncovered during the excavations in the 1980s, the archaeologists came across an approx. 80 cm deep prehistoric pit with bones and other remains, which were in the center of the temple – i.e. under the statue of the god Mercury – (and the later basilica). This could be an indication of the assumed Celtic sanctuary on the summit that was apparently carefully taken over by the Romans and turned into their sanctuary. It suggests that it was still used by the population around the Heiligenberg, even after the Celtic settlement on the mountain was abandoned,.
  • Even though the origin of the Heidenloch is uncertain, (who created it, when and why) there are good reasons to assume that it was the Celts, especially since they were the only ones who had the „manpower“ for such a large project and also because this pit was located on the outermost south-west edge of the area of ​​the inner curtain wall (circular rampart).

For geological reasons (water veins in the mountain as well as the nature of the sandstone), it is unlikely that it was used as a well or a cistern system. Any such attempts, for example by the Romans to use the Heidenloch in this manner, remained futile. This leads us to believe that the Heidenloch was used as a sacrificial pit.

If this was the case, it would make sense to put the pit on the edge of the settlement because of the possible smell of the decaying sacrificed animals. Sacrificial pits have been found in various Celtic holy districts („Nemeton“) in southwest Germany, but no deeper than 35 m. In the religious imagination of the Celts, they represented a place that symbolized the transition from life to another (under) world and were apparently dedicated to a Celtic earth deity, according to Dirk Krauße, State Archaeologist of Baden-Württemberg in a ZDF film about Celtic finds near the Heuneburg.

In Roman times, it was primarily Mercury (along with other Roman gods) who was worshiped here and whose temple was the center of the sacred area of ​​the Romans. Mercury was particularly popular among the Celts, as mentioned by Caesar in Book 6 of his De Bello Gallico. He was often identified with the Celtic god Teutates, but there is a votive tablet on the Heiligenberg, which equates Mercurius with the relatively unknown Celtic god Visucius on the left bank of the Rhine. There is also mention of Mercury as „Mercurius Cimbrianus“, that is, as a Germanic god, who was mainly equated here with Odin (or Wotan). As we know, this was made possible by the “interpretatio romana”, which promoted the equation of the Roman Olympian gods with the respective provincial gods as a part of an integrative religious policy.

After the end of the Roman and Alemannic presence, the pagan temple was Christianized in Merovingian / Frankish times and, as we can assume, consecrated to the Archangel Michael (the patronage of Michael is only guaranteed from 890). And henceforth, the Archangel Michael tends to succeed the Roman god Mercury in comparable places.

And they actually have a lot in common. We mostly know Mercury as the god of traders and thieves. But he is also a winged messenger of the gods, and the Greeks called their Hermes „Psychpombós“, i.e. as a soul companion who supports the deceased as they cross the river Styx into Hades.

Hermes als Seelengeleiter

Hermes als Seelengeleiter

Michael, also a winged messenger of God, the Archangelus, has the quality of a soul companion, and he is the weigher of souls at the Last Judgment.

 

St.Michael als Seelengeleiter (Griechisch-orthodoxe Ikone aus Kreta)

St.Michael als Seelengeleiter (Griechisch-orthodoxe Ikone aus Kreta)

It should also be mentioned that in St. Michael’s Basilica of the 10th century there was a reliquary shrine or grave in the middle of the central nave, i.e. precisely at the point where the pre-Roman sacrificial pit and the image of Mercury had been. And in the 5th/6th century a central grave was installed along the border of this pit. It was around this grave that other graves were organised. Those buried here were probably venerated by the Lorsch monks as early witnesses of faith.

 

 

In addition, the Heiligenberg was a popular burial site at various times from the Urnfield period to the end of the monastery period. It was not a cemetery, but those who could afford it, for various reasons, were happy to be laid to rest “up” here in this holy place between heaven and earth, a place with a magnificent view. This probably does not apply to the Celtic and Roman times, but even more so for the Merovingian / Frankish times, and also for the monks of the later monastery found their final resting place here. And there were always lay people, men, women and children who were buried here during the monastery period.

 

And so for at least 2 millennia, from the Celtic settlement to the end of the monastery period, there is a continuous theme of sanctuary on the Heiligenberg: It was a good place for the transition from this life to whatever imagined hereafter, accompanied by a deity or an archangel. This was the space between heaven and earth, a sacred place where one thought beyond the little worries of everyday life and confronted the difficult topic of a post-mortem existence. The fact that people were buried up here in the Urnfields period provides room for speculation that there was perhaps an even older tradition of dealing with the afterlife on the mountain.

 

In fact, the story of the local saint of the mountain fits in well with its history. One could exaggerate by saying that Friedrich von Hirsau, came to the Heiligenberg to die. His sought after asylum from the Hirsau monastery –  where he was “bullied” and falsely accused of adultery and where he lost his position as abbot –  did not last long. He did not live here for a very long time, and the wonderful circumstances of his death that have been told make him the venerated saint of the region and his grave the destination of pilgrimages to the monastery and the east crypt. And this contains more than a relic, it contains Friederich’s grave that is set into the rock. A grave as a pilgrimage destination, how fitting to the history of the mountain!

 

Das Grab des als heilig verehrten Friedrich von Hirsau

Literatur zur Geschichte des Heiligenberges

Forschungen zum Heiligenberg; Forschungsgeschichte, Fundmaterial, Restaurierung (Forschungen und Berichte der Archäologie des Mittelalters in Baden Württemberg Band 32) herausgegeben vom Landesamt für Denkmalspflege im Regierungspräsidium Stuttgart, Stuttgart 2012, 568 Seiten

darin folgende ausführliche Darstellungen:

  • Peter Marzolff, Die Ausgrabungen zu St. Michael
  • Bert Burger, Klosterruine  St. Michael – Bauforschung und Sicherungsarbeiten 1978 – 1984
  • Fridolin Reutti, Römische Funde und Baukeramik aus der Grabung 1980 – 1984
  • Bernhard Holtheide, Ein silbernes Votivblech für Merkur
  • Uwe Gross, Die mittelalterlichen und neuzeitlichen Keramik-, Metall- und Beinfunde
  • Peter-Hugo Martin, Die Feldmünzen

 

Wolfgang von Moers-Messmer; Der Heiligenberg bei Heidelberg, herausgegeben von der Schutzgemeinschaft Heiligenberg, 3. Aufl. Heidelberg 1987, 102 Seiten, (leider vergriffen)

 

Renate Ludwig und Peter Marzolff, Der Heiligenberg bei Heidelberg (Führer zu archäologischen Denkmälern in Baden-Württemberg 20), 2. Aufl. Stuttgart 2008, 118 Seiten (leider vergriffen)

 

Alexander Heinzmann, Die Ringwälle auf dem Heiligenberg bei Heidelberg – Keltischer Fürstensitz oder Keltenstadt? Heidelberg 2018, 44 Seiten

 

Alexander Heinzmann, Der Heiligenberg bei Heidelberg – in Bildern des Malers Heinrich Hoffmann, Heidelberg 2017, 64 Seiten

Fotos der 80.er Jahre: Ausgrabungen und Restaurierungen

Daten zur Geschichte des Heiligenberges

Vor Christi Geburt

5500 – 5000 Älteste Funde der Bandkeramik; sporadische Begehungen
5000 – 4400 Früheste Siedlungsspuren aus der Jungsteinzeit
Ab 1200 Urnengräberzeitliche Besiedlung über den Bereich der inneren Keltenmauer hinaus mit vielen Keramikfunden
7. bis 3. Jahrhundert Keltische Besiedlung: Fürstensitz, Kultstätte (Heidenloch?); 2 Ringmauern; zeitweilig ausgedehnte Besiedlung des Heiligenberges, etwa 400 Wohnpodien nachgewiesen

Nach Christi Geburt

Um 80 bis 260/70 Römischer Tempelbezirk der Militärsiedlung in Neuenheim mit Merkurtempel und Jupiterheiligtum
300 – 500 Geringe Spuren der Begehung während der Völkerwanderungszeit
Um 600 Zahlreiche Begräbnisse auf dem hinteren Gipfel lassen auf merowingische Besiedlung schließen
700 – 882 Anlage einer fränkischen Königsburg unter Verwendung der keltischen Mauerreste; Umwidmung des Merkurtempels in eine Michaelskirche; Beginn der Anwesenheit von Benediktinermönchen des Klosters Lorsch auf dem „Aberinesberg“
870 Erster Neubau einer Michaelskirche unter Verwendung von Teilen der Tempelmauern
882 Der (ost)fränkische König Ludwig III. schenkt den Aberinesberg dem Kloster Lorsch
9./10. Jahrhundert Die auf dem Berg anwesenden Mönche gestalten die Michaelskirche mehrfach um zu einer dreischiffigen Basilika
1023 Kaiser Heinrich II. erlaubt dem Lorscher Abt Reginbald einen Neubau von Kirche und Kloster auf dem Heiligenberg
1069/70 Der ehemalige Hirsauer Abt Friedrich kommt auf den Heiligenberg und stirbt dort; Grab in der Ostkrypta
1090 Mönch Arnold gründet auf den Vordergipfel eine Klause
1094 Abt Anshelm von Lorsch fördert ebendort den Bau eines Klosters, das St. Stephan und später auch St. Laurentius gewidmet ist.
Um 1100 Grabplatte der Hazecha im Eingangsbereich der Stephanskirche
1101 Abt Anshelm von Lorsch wird im Stephanskloster begraben
1232 Der Heiligenberg kommt in den Besitz des Erzbistums Mainz
Um 1265 Prämonstratenserchorherren aus dem Kloster Allerheiligen im Schwarzwald folgen auf die vertriebenen Benediktinermönche.
1460 Der Heiligenberg kommt unter die Verwaltung der Kurpfalz
16. Jahrhundert Niedergang des Michaelsklosters
1503 Einsturz des Glockenturms in der Nacht; drei Patres werden erschlagen
1537 Der Humanist Jakob Micyllus beschreibt das Michaelskloster als Ruine
nach 1555 Reformation in der Kurpfalz, die Klöster werden vom Kurfürsten eingezogen
1589 Die Klosterruinen werden der Universität als Steinbruch für Erweiterungsbauten überlassen
1645 Merian fertigt einen Stich vom der Michaelsruine und dem Heidenloch an
1840 Victor Hugo stattet dem Heiligenberg bei einem Aufenthalt in Heidelberg einen nächtlichen (!) Besuch ab
1886 Der Architekt und Archäologe Wilhelm Schleuning untersucht im Auftrag des badischen Staats die Ruine
1903 Heiligenberg geht ins Eigentum der Stadt Heidelberg über
1907 Erforschung des Ringwallsystems durch den Prähistoriker Ernst Schmidt
Um 1920 Der Künstler Heinrich Hoffman fertigt Zeichnungen vom Heiligenberg an, teils als Rekonstruktionen
1912, 1921, 1932 Untersuchungen des Michaels- sowie des Stephanskloster durch den Baureferendar Carl Koch
1929 Die Gaststätte „Waldschenke“ wird gebaut
1934/35 Die „Feierstätte“ („Thingstätte“) wird durch den Reichsarbeitsdienst im Zentrum der keltischen Siedlung errichtet und 1935 unter Anwesenheit von Reichspropagandaminister Josef Göbbels eröffnet
1936 Unter der Leitung von P.H. Stemmermann wird der Schutt aus dem Heidenloch geräumt
Nachkriegszeit bis ca. 1970 Zunehmender Verfall der Ruine sowie Diebstahl von Architekturstücken
1973 Auf Betreiben des Bodendenkmalspflegers Berndmark Heukemes wird die „Schutzgemeinschaft Heiligenberg“ gegründet
1980-1984 Archäologische Grabungen im Bereich des Michaelsklosters durch den Archäologen Peter Marzolff und Restaurierung der Ruine durch den Architekten Bert Burger
1996 Restaurierung des Stephansklosters durch Bert Burger
2019 Lehrgrabung im Bereich der inneren Keltenmauer unter Leitung der Archäologin des Kurpfälzischen Museums Renate Ludwig

Rekonstruktionen

Rekonstruktionen von Bernhard Oswald – Miltenberg

Fotostrecke

Geschichte des Berges

Der Heiligenberg mit seinen beiden auffälligen Gipfeln erhebt sich über dem Austritt des Neckars in die Rheinebene, er gehört zum Gebirge des Odenwaldes, ist von diesem aber weitgehend getrennt bis auf den nordöstlichen Sattel zum Zollstock. Ansonsten verfügt er über verhältnismäßig steile Flanken und bot damit zu allen Zeiten mehrere Vorteile:

  • Von hier ließen sich wichtige Militär- und Handelswege zu Wasser und zu Lande kontrollieren, und zwar sowohl in Nord-Süd- als auch in Ost-West-Richtung
  • Wer auf den bis ins 19. Jahrhundert stets baumfreien Gipfeln siedelte, hatte einen Weitblick nach Norden bis Worms, nach Westen bis zum Pfälzer Wald, nach Südwesten bis Speyer, nach Süden bis zum Nordschwarzwald und ins Neckartal hinein bis Schlierbach. Ebenso wurden größere Bauten auf dem Gipfel von weither in der Ebene gesehen und dienten auch als Orientierungspunkt.
  • Durch seine relativ steile Form ließ er sich gut gegen Angriffe verteidigen.
  • Der Buntsandstein, aus dem große Teile bestehen, lässt sich gut abbauen und als Baumaterial verwenden.
  • Das im Buntsandstein eingeschlossene Braunerz trägt zu einem messbar erhöhten Magnetismus bei, der von sensiblen Menschen als angenehm wahrgenommen wird und sicher zu der Jahrtausende währenden Nutzung als Heiliger Ort beigetragen hat.
  • Dabei ist die Armut an höher gelegenen Quellen der Wermutstropfen, nur der Bitterbrunnen bietet in größerer Höhe regelmäßig Wasser, sonst allenfalls (bis vor einige Jahre) noch der nicht weit entfernte Zollstockbrunnen.
Heidelberg mit Heiligenberg 1654. Merian

Heidelberg mit Heiligenberg 1654. Merian

Seinen Namen erhielt der Berg erst im Spätmittelalter, als das Michaelskloster im 13. Jahrhundert von Mönchen des Prämonstratenserklosters Allerheiligen im Schwarzwald besiedelt wurde. Der Berg hieß fortan „mons omnium sanctorum“ oder „Allerheiligenberg“, von dem sich die heutige Kurzform ableitet. Im Früh- und Hochmittelalter trug er den Namen „Aberinesberg“ oder auch „Aberinesburg“, der von den Mönchen in Texten auch zu „Abrahamsberg“ fromm verballhornt wurde.

Jungsteinzeit bis zur Urnenfelderzeit

Die ältesten Funde datieren aus der frühen Jungsteinzeit um 5000 v. Chr. Es sind Gefäßscherben der Bandkeramik, die noch keine Rückschlüsse auf eine Besiedlung zulassen. Gefäßscherben der Rössener Kultur, Silexartefakte und Pfeilspitzen aus dem gesamten Bereich des späteren inneren Keltenwalls lassen eher auf eine Besiedlung im mittleren Neolithikum schließen. Dagegen fehlen Funde aus der Bronzezeit, bis auf solche aus der Spätphase der Urnenfelderkultur um 1000 v. Chr., die auf eine intensive Besiedlung schließen lassen.

Funde des Neolithikums und der Bronzezeit © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Funde des Neolithikums und der Bronzezeit © KMH (E. Kemmet)

 

Kelten

Zwischen 700 und 200/150 v. Chr. lässt sich eine mehr oder weniger intensive keltische Siedlungstätigkeit archäologisch nachweisen. Das beginnt, wohl ausgehend von der nördlichen Bergkuppe, mit einer keltischen Höhenbefestigung und einem „Fürstensitz“ nebst zahlreichen Wohnplätzen und endet möglicherweise mit einem spätkeltischen „oppidum“ ca. 200 Jahre vor der Zeitenwende.
Sichtbare Befunde im Gelände, einige – leider – wenige Grabungen und vor allem Zufallsfunde ergeben eine vages Bild von der keltischen Präsenz auf dem Heiligenberg.

Großer doppelkonischer Topf aus der Lantènezeit © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Großer doppelkonischer Topf aus der Lantènezeit © KMH (E. Kemmet)

1860 erkannte man in zwei konzentrisch um die beiden Bergkuppen verlaufenden Wällen eine keltische Befestigung mit einer inneren (2,1 km lang) und einer äußeren (3,1 km lang) Ringmauer (siehe Karte). Später konnten in diesem Bereich rund 400 Wohnpodien, das sind in den Hang terrassierte Hüttenplätze, nachgewiesen werden. Damit ist die befestigte Siedlung eine der größten keltischen Anlagen in Baden-Württemberg. Die Wälle sind der zusammengefallene Überrest einer gewaltigen Holz- Steine- Erde- Konstruktion, einer typisch keltischen „Pfostenschlitzmauer“. Das bestätigte eine Lehrgrabung im Sommer 2019.

 

Keltische Pfostenschlitzmauer © KMH (B. Pfeifroth/P. Marzolff).

Keltische Pfostenschlitzmauer © KMH (B. Pfeifroth/P. Marzolff).

(Am Donnersberg wurde eine Stück keltische Pfostenschlitzmauer rekonstruiert:)

 

Keltenmauer Donnersberg

Keltenmauer Donnersberg

Die Funde auf dem Berg belegen eine befestigte keltische Siedlung auf und um die nördliche Kuppe, wohl in direkter Nachfolge der dortigen urnenfelderzeitlichen Siedlung.

Arm- und Fußringe aus Bronze und wirbelförmige Perle (Frühlatène) © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Arm- und Fußringe aus Bronze und wirbelförmige Perle (Frühlatène) © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Auf der künstlich erweiterten Bergkuppe könnte sich ein Höhenheiligtum befunden haben – eine lange Verehrungstradition an dieser Stelle spricht dafür. Der archäologische Nachweis eines Fürstensitzes mit entsprechender Wohnbebauung nach Süden hin ist durch den Bau der „Thingstätte“ zur NS-Zeit unmöglich gemacht worden. Auf der südlichen Kuppe, am Rande der Siedlung, befindet sich ein 56 m tiefer Schacht im anstehenden Buntsandstein, das „Heidenloch“. Römische und mittelalterliche Ausbauspuren weisen auf den – vergeblichen – Versuch hin, hier einen Brunnen oder eine Wasserzisterne zu bauen. Die Lage des Ortes auf dem Gipfel und die Geologie sprechen gegen eine solche Anlage. Eher sprechen viele Indizien für die Existenz eines keltischen Opferschachtes, wie er auch andernorts gefunden wurde, wenn auch nicht von der imposanten Tiefe des „Heidenlochs“.
Ende des 19. Jhs. entdeckte man im Stadtteil Bergheim, unweit des Neckars, den lebensgroßen Kopf einer Sandsteinstatue. Er zeigt, wie man heute weiß, einen keltischen „Fürsten“ mit der typischen Blattkrone und stammt wohl von seinem (noch) unbekannten Grabhügel.

Keltenkopf.Badisches Landesmuseum Karlsruhe. Foto: Thomas Goldschmidt

Keltenkopf.Badisches Landesmuseum Karlsruhe. Foto: Thomas Goldschmidt

Ähnliche Funde am Glauberg in Hessen deuten auf kulturelle und wirtschaftliche Verbindungen zwischen den beiden Fürstensitzen um 370 v. Chr. hin.

Fürst vom Glauberg

Fürst vom Glauberg

Die Keltenfestung auf dem Heiligenberg kontrollierte immerhin die Handelswege im Tal und auf dem Neckar mit Verbindung zur Donau, lebte somit von Handel und Handwerk. Der Fund zweier Eisenbarren deutet darauf hin.

Keltische Eisenbarrenm Reste eines Gusstiegels, Eisenschlacken © KMH (R. Ajtai/VE.DO)

Keltische Eisenbarrenm Reste eines Gusstiegels, Eisenschlacken © KMH (R. Ajtai/VE.DO)

Eisendepotfund aus der Mittellatènezeit © KMH (R. Ajtai/VE.DO)

Eisendepotfund aus der Mittellatènezeit © KMH (R. Ajtai/VE.DO)

Zur Zeit der „keltischen Wanderung“ (ab 400 v. Chr.) schwindet die Bedeutung der Höhenbefestigung als Machtzentrum am unteren Neckar, die Bevölkerung dünnt aus. Dennoch wird innerhalb der Ringwälle gesiedelt, wie Funde belegen. Möglicherweise gab es sogar um 200 v. Chr. auf dem Berg eine spätkeltische Stadt, ein „oppidum“, was aber (noch) nicht durch Funde belegt ist.
Spätestens aber um 100 v. Chr. verlieren sich die keltischen Spuren, die verbliebene keltische Bevölkerung verschmilzt mit den germanischen Einwanderern, den Neckarsueben. Es bleiben die Ringwälle und die Erinnerung an das keltische Höhenheiligtum auf der Nordkuppe. Davon zeugen im Hauptschiff der Michaelsbasilika die Überreste eines römischen Tempels, geweiht einem mit keltischen (Visucius) und germanischen (Cimbrianus = Wotan)) Göttern verschmolzenen Merkur.

Römer

In der Zeit von Kaiser Vespasian (69-79 n.Chr.) wurden auf dem rechten Rheinufer im sog. Dekumatenland in Germania Superior eine Reihe von Kastellen angelegt, um dieses Gebiet bis hin zum östlich verlaufenden Limes zu schützen. Hauptort in unserer Gegend war LOPODVNVM (Ladenburg), wo um diese Zeit ein zweites Castrum angelegt und bald darauf mit der Anlage einer Stadt sowie dem Bau eines großen Forums begonnen wurde. In Heidelberg-Neuenheim wurde ein Castrum angelegt sowie eine Neckarbrücke gebaut, später folgte ein zweites Kastell sowie um das Jahr 200 eine Neckarbrücke auf Steinpfeilern.

Römerbrücke Neuenheim.KMH

Römische Neckarbrücke Neuenheim.KMH

Grund war die Anlage einer Militärstraße östlich des Rheines von MOGONTIACVM (Mainz) über LOPODUNUM bis nach AQVAE (Baden-Baden) und ARGENTORATE (Straßburg), mit einer anderen Abzweigung auch nach AVGVSTA VENDILICORVM (Augsburg). Neben dem Militärlager in Neuenheim entstanden kleine zivile Siedlungen, in denen vor allem Handwerksbetriebe mit Ziegel- und Keramikproduktion vorherrschend waren. Ein ausgedehntes Gräberfeld wurde nachgewiesen.

Auf dem Heiligenberg wurde in der 2. Hälfte des 1. Jahrhunderts ein heiliger Bezirk angelegt.

Römischer Kultbezirk (Rekonstruktion) © KMH (B. Pfeifroth/P. Marzolff)

Römischer Kultbezirk (Rekonstruktion) © KMH (B. Pfeifroth/P. Marzolff)

Zentrum und wichtigstes Gebäude war ein Merkurtempel. Seine Umrisse sind im Mitteschiff der Michaelsbasilika mit dunklen Steinen angedeutet. Ein genordeter rechteckiger Saalbau mit einer Apsis war außen mit einem roten Fugenstrich bunt bemalt, innen mit bemaltem Putz, rotem Porphyr sowie weißem Marmor verkleidet.

Merkurtempel (Rekonstruktion) © KMH (B. Pfeifroth:P. Marzolff)

Merkurtempel (Rekonstruktion) © KMH (B. Pfeifroth:P. Marzolff)

Durch Weiheinschriften in Stein und Votivtäfelchen wissen wir, dass hier ein MERCVRIVS CIMBRIANUS bzw. MERCVRIVS VISVCIVS verehrt wurde, d.h., dass hier im Sinne der Interpretatio Romana der römische Gott mit einem germanischen bzw. keltischen gleichsetzt wurde.

 

Weiheinschrift für Merkur Cimbrianus © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Weiheinschrift für Merkur Cimbrianus © KMH (E. Kemmet)

 

Rekonstruktion eines silbernes Votivblechs aus dem Merkurtempel © KMH (R. Dale)

Rekonstruktion eines silbernes Votivblechs aus dem Merkurtempel © KMH (R. Dale)

Silberne Votivbleche für Merkur © KMH (R. Ajtai/VE.DO)

Silberne Votivbleche für Merkur © KMH (R. Ajtai/VE.DO)

 

 

Ebenso wurden Reste von zwei Jupitergigantensäulen gefunden sowie Hinweise auf weitere Heiligtümer und kleinere Gebäude.

Jupitergigantensäule © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Jupitergigantensäule © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Die römische Anwesenheit endete mit den Einfällen der Alamannen ab 260, als das rechtsrheinische Gebiet weitgehend aufgegeben werden musste.

Franken

Aus der Zeit der Völkerwanderung gibt wenige Funde, die belegen, dass der heilige Berg nach wie vor begangen wurde, das Heiligtum wird nach der Römerzeit wohl eher geplündert worden sein. Nach der Christianisierung der Alamannen im 5. Jahrhundert, die in unserer Gegend vorherrschend waren, kam es zu einer Umwidmung des noch erhaltenen Merkurtempels auf dem Heiligenberg in eine christliche Kirche, die wohl von Anfang an dem Erzengel Michael geweiht war. Wenn auch der Gott der Händler und Taschendiebe und der biblische Drachentöter wenig gemeinsam zu haben scheinen, so gibt es doch auch erstaunliche Übereinstimmungen. Der Gott Hermes/Merkur ist wie Michael ein gefiederter Götterbote, dazu nennen ihn die Griechen auch den „Psychpombós“, den Begleiter der verstorbenen Seelen über den Styx in den Hades. Und auch Michael gilt als Seelenbegleiter nach dem Tode. Wenn wir dazu zur Kenntnis nehmen, dass auf dem Heiligberg Gräber aus allen Zeiten seit 3000 Jahren – außer der Römerzeit, dafür besonders intensiv in der merowingisch-fränkischen Phase, – nachgewiesen wurden, so passt diese Gemeinsamkeit der beiden Bergpatrone gut zu dem Ort.

In der Frankenzeit entstand auf dem Heiligenberg – wohl im Zusammenhang mit dem fränkischen Königshof in Ladenburg – eine Königsburg, einige Gebäude aus dieser Zeit sind archäologisch nachgewiesen, darunter ein mächtiger Turm mit massivem Mauerwerk – eine Art Bergfried, wie es auf späteren Burgen gab, oder ein Wohnturm – im Bereich der späteren Klausur. Wohl wurden auch Reste der alten Keltenmauern zur Sicherung der Anlage benutzt, denn an zwei Stellen wurden mörtelgemauerte Kammertore entdeckt, wie sie aus der karolingischen Zeit andernorts bekannt sind. Am westlichsten Rand des Paradieses sind noch Befestigungsmauern aus der Zeit der Königsburg zu sehen.

Fränkische Burg (Rekonstruktion) © KMH (B. Pfeifroth/P. Marzolff)

Fränkische Burg (Rekonstruktion) © KMH (B. Pfeifroth/P. Marzolff)

Auf dieser jetzt Aberinesberg oder -burg genannten Festung wurde in der 2. Hälfte des 9. Jahrhunderts neben der militärischen Besatzung eine Dependance des fränkischen Reichklosters Lorsch eingerichtet. Lorsch hatte rund um den Heiligenberg viele Besitztümer, und so war es nur konsequent, dass es mit einigen Mönchen vor Ort sein wollte, um besser seine Güter und Einkommen zu verwalten. (Fast alle Dörfer rund um Heidelberg, heute meist Vororte, haben ihre erste urkundliche Erwähnung im 8. Jahrhundert, gesammelt und festgehalten im Lorscher Codex im 12. Jahrhundert.) Und der Lorscher Abt Thiotroch ließ auf den Berg um 870 eine neue Michaelskirche errichten (jetzt ist das Patrozinium urkundlich gesichert), die Teile der römischen Mauern in den Bau mit einbezogen.

Mögliche Rekonstruktion St Michael im 10. Jh. v.Moers-Messmer 1987

St Michael im 10. Jh. (Rekonstruktion v.Moers-Messmer 1987)

So kam es zu einem Nebeneinander von königlicher und klösterlicher Präsenz auf dem Berg. Dann wurde 882 von König Ludwig III. die Aberinesburg dem Kloster Lorsch geschenkt.

Benediktiner/ Prämonstratenser

Wir können weiterhin davon ausgehen, dass es keine Klosterbauten im Sinne einer Klausur gegeben hat, sondern die Mönche bewohnten wohl die auf der Burg vorhandenen Bauten. Da die Filiale von Lorsch auf dem Heiligenberg aber mit der Schenkung auch die zugehörigen Besitztümer bekam, war nun viel Geld da, und so wurde die Michaelskirche im 9. und 10. Jahrhundert viele Male umgebaut, am Ende (um das Jahr 1000) stand eine dreischiffige Basilika mit Querhaus und drei Chorapsiden.

1023 erteilte Kaiser Heinrich II. dem Lorscher Abt Reginbald, dem späteren Bauherrn und Bischof des Speyerer Domes, die Erlaubnis, auf dem Heiligenberg ein reguläres Kloster zu errichten. Die bisherige Kirche wurde bis auf den Chor und die Ostkrypta niedergelegt und mit größeren Maßen wieder als dreischiffige Basilika neu gebaut. Sie wurde laut Lorscher Chronik prächtig ausgestattet, noch heute demonstriert der Luxus der zwei (!) großzügigen Treppentürme, dass hier offensichtlich nicht geringe Mittel zur Verfügung standen. Um das mächtige Westwerk mit seinen zwei Türmen statisch auf dem nach Westen abschüssigen Grund zu sichern, wurde eine Westkrypta als Basis eingebaut.

Archivolte eines mittelalterlichen Schmuckportals aus dem Kloster © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Archivolte eines mittelalterlichen Schmuckportals aus dem Kloster © KMH (E. Kemmet)

Im Westen wurde ein Paradies oder Atrium genannter Vorhof errichtet, der allerdings in den nächsten Jahrhunderten vielfach umgebaut und vornehmlich als Friedhof des Klosters genutzt wurde. Nicht neben, wie bei den meisten Klöstern, sondern wegen der Geländestruktur im Osten der Kirche wurde die Klausur, der Lebens- und Arbeitsbereich der Mönche, errichtet. Es waren dies Benediktiner, weiterhin blieb das Michaelskloster ein Filialkloster von Lorsch, so wurde es auch nicht von einem Abt, sondern von einem Propst geleitet. Auf Merians Darstellung aus dem 16. Jahrhundert ist ein Vierungsturm zu sehen, der vielleicht erst später hinzukam und kein Glockenturm war, dieser stand wohl neben der nördlichen Chorapside, auch das erst seit dem 15. Jahrhundert.

St. Michael von Südwest. Hoffmann

St. Michael von Südwest. Hoffmann

Im Jahre 1069 wurde im Kloster der ehemalige Abt Friedrich von Hirsau aufgenommen. Nach der Überlieferung war er ein besonders frommer Kleriker, der durch eine Intrige im dortigen Kloster vom Herrn des Klosters, dem Grafen von Calw, von seinem Amt abberufen wurde. Um ihm die Schmach zu ersparen, unter diesen Umständen weiter in Hirsau leben zu müssen, vermittelte der Lorscher Abt Uldarich ihm eine Art Alterssitz im Michaelskloster. Allerdings verstarb er schon im Jahr 1070, in den Dörfern der Umgebung wegen seiner Mildtätigkeit geliebt. So ranken sich auch Legenden von Licht- und Engelserscheinungen um seinen Tod, und bis heute ist Friedrich von Hirsau ein in der Diözese Speyer verehrter Heiliger, obwohl von der Kirche als solcher nie kanonisiert. Mit großer Sicherheit fand er seine letzte Ruhestätte in dem in den Felsen eingetieften Grab in der Mitte der Ostkrypta, das zu einem Wallfahrtsziel wurde, besonders am 8. Mai. Auch heute findet man oft einen Blumenstrauß auf der Grabplatte, die neu angefertigte wurde, da in 19. Jahrhundert das Grab zerstört wurde.

Um 1090 baute der Benediktinermönch Arnold auf dem vorderen Gipfel eine Klause sowie ein Oratorium (kleine Kapelle). Etwa 4 Jahre später wurde an dieser Stelle mit Förderung des Lorscher Abtes Anshelm ein weiteres kleineres Filialkloster gegründet, dessen Reste heute als Ruine zusehen sind. Es wurde dem heiligen Stephan, später zudem noch dem heiligen Laurentius geweiht.

Stephanskloster (Rekonstruktion nach v. Moers-Messmer)

Stephanskloster (Rekonstruktion nach v. Moers-Messmer)

 

Ein Handschuhsheimer Ritter namens Rifrid war nicht nur ein Zeuge der Stiftungsurkunde des Klosters, er hat wahrscheinlich auch einen Teil seines Vermögens dem Kloster vermacht. 1932 wurde ein Grabstein gefunden, dessen lateinische Inschrift besagt, dass die Frau oder Witwe des Rifrid hier (im Kloster) begraben zu werden wünscht und ihm ihr Vermögen vermacht mit der Bedingung, dass die Mönche ihr Gedenken zu ihrer Seligkeit bewahren. Als Datum des Todes ist der 23. Dezember ohne Jahreszahl angegeben. Eine Kopie des Grabsteines, dessen Original sich im Kurpfälzischen Museum befindet, ist heute im Westteil der Stephanskirche zu sehen. (Dieser Grabstein ist das älteste nachantike schriftliche Zeugnis, das auf Heidelberger Boden gefunden wurde.) Aus Angaben der Lorscher Chronik kann man annehmen, dass Rifrid mit dem ersten Kreuzzug 1096 ins Heilige Land zog und wahrscheinlich nicht zurückkehrte.

Grabplatte der Hazecha aus St. Stephan © KMH (P. Pfeifroth / T. Schöneweis)

Grabplatte der Hazecha aus St. Stephan © KMH (P. Pfeifroth / T. Schöneweis)

Ebenso in St. Stephan wurde 1101 der Abt Anshelm begraben, an dessen Todestag, dem 25. Juni, eine Prozession von Handschuhsheim zum Kloster zog. Vom Prozessionsweg hat sich der Name erhalten, verballhornt zur „Amselgasse“. Sein Grab konnte nicht gefunden werden.

Im 13. Jahrhundert verlor Lorsch seine beherrschende Stellung, auf Betreiben des Mainzer Erzbischofs wurde seine Immunität aufgehoben, die Benediktiner mussten Lorsch verlassen und wurden 1245 durch Prämonstratenser Chorherren aus dem Schwarzwälder Kloster Allerheiligen ersetzt, die einige Zeit später auch die Filiale St. Michael übernahmen. Der Heiligenberg, der nun seinen heutigen Namen erhielt („Allerheiligenberg“), gehörte fortan zum unter Mainzer Aufsicht stehenden Amt Schauenburg.

Das änderte sich erst 1460 durch den Sieg des Kurfüsten Friedrich des Siegreichen bei Pfeddersheim in der Mainzer Stiftsfehde, wodurch das Amt Schauenburg und damit der Heiligenberg in die Verfügungsgewalt der Kurpfalz geriet.

Unter den Prämonstratensern gab es einige Umbauten in Kirche und Kloster. So wurden frühgotische Fenster in die Apsiden eingefügt, ein Teil des Kreuzganges wurde später mit gotischen Maßwerkfenstern ausgestattet, außer dem Calefactorium wurde jetzt auch andere Räume mit Heizmöglichkeiten ausgestattet, so wurde Kacheln eines luxuriösen Ofens entdeckt. Das Koster wurde unter den Prämonstratensern wohl auch mehr und mehr zu einem Wallfahrtszentrum.

Außer den zwei genannten Prozessionen auf den Heiligenberg sind noch zwei andere überliefert. Eine „Rolloss“ genannte Flurprozession, an die auch ein Wegname in Handschuhsheim erinnert, am Montag der 6. Woche vor Ostern ging wohl auf alte heidnische Fruchtbarkeitsriten zurück, und es ist anzunehmen, dass es bei diesen Gelegenheiten recht derb zuging, so dass die Heidelberger Universität im Jahr 1423 ihren Angehörigen bei Strafe verbot, weiter daran teilzunehmen. Seit der Prämonstratenserzeit gab es eine Prozession am Vorabend von Allerheiligen, also am 31. Oktober, an der auch der Kurfürst teilzunehmen pflegte und mit der ein Jahrmarkt auf dem Gelände nördlich des Klosters verbunden war.

Im 15. Jahrhundert scheint ein Niedergang der Klöster auf dem Heiligenberg einzusetzen, auch die Zahl der Mönche wurde viel kleiner. Als laut einer Meldung an den Kurfürsten 1503 der Glockenturm, der bei einem vorangegangenen Erdbeben im Jahr 1474 beschädigt worden war, in einer Nacht einstürzte, traf er die Schlafkammer und erschlug 3 Mönche. 1537 erfahren wir von dem Heidelberger Humanisten Micyllus, dass er auf dem hinteren Berggipfel bereits eine Ruine vorfand. Bis Mitte des 16. Jahrhunderts scheint das Stephanskloster noch von einigen bzw. einem Mönch („Bruder Moritz“) bewohnt gewesen zu sein.

Heidenloch und Michaelskloster. Merian 1645

Heidenloch und Michaelskloster. Merian 1645

Ruinenzeit

„Du grüner Berg, der du mit zweyen Spitzen
Parnasso gleichst, du hoher Fels, bey dir
wünsch ich in Ruh zu bleiben für und für…“

So beschreibt der Barockdichter Martin Opitz, um 1620 Student in Heidelberg, in einem Sonett den Heiligenberg und vergleicht ihn mit dem Musenberg Parnass.

Der Berg fasziniert inzwischen mehr durch seine Natur und außergewöhnliche Gestalt, die lange Geschichte der Besiedelung und Verehrung höherer Mächte gerät immer mehr in Vergessenheit. Zwar ist auf einem Stich von Matthias Merian von 1645 das Kloster St. Michael noch als imposante Ruine zu sehen, hat also seit der Ersterwähnung als Ruine (1537) schon über einhundert Jahre dem gänzlichen Verfall getrotzt, obschon der Universität Heidelberg als Steinbruch übereignet. Doch Raubgräberei und exzessiver Steinraub, bedingt durch den Wiederaufbau der kriegszerstörten Dörfer am Fuß des Berges nach den pfälzisch-französischen Erbfolgekrieg (ab 1689), lassen von den beiden Klöstern bald nur noch Grundmauern übrig, allmählich überwachsen.

 

Die Türme des Klosters als Steinbruch nach einer Zeichnung von Ph. Förster 1830

Die Türme des Klosters als Steinbruch (nach einer Zeichnung von Ph. Förster 1830)

Es bleibt eine geheimnisvolle Erinnerung an „heidnische“ und mittelalterliche Altertümer, die den Romantiker Victor Hugo bei seiner Deutschlandreise 1840 zu einem nächtlichen Besuch des Berges bewegt.

Ruine des Michaelsklosters 1814 (Stahlstich von de Graimberg) © KMH

Ruine des Michaelsklosters 1814 (Stahlstich von de Graimberg) © KMH

Für die Geschichte des Berges beginnt man sich erst ab 1860 zu interessieren, als Julius Näher die Ringwälle entdeckt und – zunächst – für „germanisch“ erklärt. Das neue erwachte Interesse an der Vorgeschichte hat natürlich etwas mit der sich entwickelnden Einigung und Nationwerdung Deutschlands zu tun. So finden nun ab 1886 (Wilhelm Schleuning) bis in die 1930er Jahre (Carl Koch) Ausgrabungen an den Klöstern und den Ringwällen statt. Die Stadt Heidelberg, seit 1903 durch die Eingemeindung des Dorfes Handschuhsheim Eigentümerin des Heiligenberges, zeigt zu der Zeit ein großes Interesse an den Forschungen. Zwischen 1910 und 1920 begeht der Maler Heinrich Hoffmann immer wieder den Berg, fertig akribische Zeichnungen der Ruinen und rekonstruiert mit dem Zeichenstift den – möglichen – historischen Zustand, heute eine wertvolle Bildquelle.

Der Bau des Aussichtsturmes (1885) mitten in die Ruinen des Klosters St. Stephan, noch dazu mit dessen Steinen, kann heute nur bedauert werden. Noch schlimmer kommt es aber mit dem Bau der „Thingstätte“, 1934/35 durch den Reichsarbeitsdienst mitten in die keltische Siedlungsfläche gesetzt, eine nicht wieder gut zu machende Zerstörung historischer Schichten. Der für 15.000 Besucher angelegte Nachbau eines antiken Theaters, von der germanophilen Thingbewegung für deutsch-nationale Propagandazwecke gedacht, passt aber schon 1937 nicht mehr ins Konzept der Nationalsozialisten, er wird erst in „Feierstätte“ umbenannt – und wird dann nutzlos!

Es ist der Archäologe Berndmark Heukemes, der ab 1950 wieder auf die historische Bedeutung des Berges verweist, 1973 zum Erhalt der Denkmale die „Schutzgemeinschaft Heiligenberg“ gründet und eine Kette von Sondierungen und Instandsetzungen auslöst: Über dem Heidenloch entsteht eine Schutzhütte, die Ruinen der Klöster St. Stephan (Bert Burger 1996) und St. Michael (Peter Marzolff ab 1980) werden restauriert und teilrekonstruiert, so die beiden Westtürme und die Westkrypta.

Anlass für gründliche Instandsetzungen und archäologische Forschungen in St. Michael war der fortschreitende Verfall der Ruinen der beiden Westtürme. Berndmark Heukemes schlug als Heidelberger Archäologe und vor allem als Vorstand der Schutzgemeinschaft Heiligenberg Alarm. Es gelang ihm, die Stadt Heidelberg, die Universität und das Land Baden-Württemberg in ein Boot zu holen und zwei Millionen DM bereitzustellen, so dass man zwischen 1978 und 1984 die gesamte Ruine des St. Michaels-Klosters restaurieren und teilweise auch archäologisch untersuchen konnte. Unter Leitung von Architekt Bert Burger wurden die Stümpfe der beiden Westtürme saniert und begehbar gemacht und die Westkrypta – bis dahin ein mit Schutt gefülltes Loch – in Annäherung an den Zustand von 1200 wieder eingewölbt. Im Klausurtrakt wurden Mauerzüge im historisch richtigen Sinne ergänzt und die Fehlrekonstruktionen durch den Arbeitsdienst in den 30er Jahren beseitigt.

Die von Peter Marzolff – Institut für Ur- und Frühgeschichte der Uni Heidelberg – durchgeführten Grabungen in ausgewählten Teilen der Anlage ergaben überraschende neue Erkenntnisse: Unter dem Fußboden des Mittelschiffes konnten die Grundmauern eines mit der Apsis nach Norden gerichteten römischen Merkurtempels freigelegt werden. Damit wurde die bislang nur vermutete Existenz eines römischen Gipfelheiligtums archäologisch bestätigt. Heute sind die Grundrisse des Tempels durch Pflastersteine in der Klosterkirche markiert. Das Drängen der Schutzgemeinschaft, sich ernsthaft um die Erhaltung der Ruinen zu kümmern, war somit von Erfolg gekrönt. Da die nun gesicherten Ruinen auch weiterhin regelmäßig gepflegt und ausgebessert werden müssen, bezuschusst die Schutzgemeinschaft, ganz im Sinne ihres Zweckes, die anfallenden Arbeiten.

 

Ausgrabung in der Kirche. Foto: Institut für Ur- und Frühgeschichte Universität Heidelberg

Ausgrabung in der Kirche 1983. Foto: Institut für Ur- und Frühgeschichte Universität Heidelberg

So hat sie auch zusammen mit dem Kurpfälzischen Museum Heidelberg, dem Arbeitskreis für Archäologie in Baden und dem Landesdenkmalamt eine kleinflächige Lehrgrabung (Schöneweiß 2019) finanziert. Diese Grabung hat die Konstruktion der inneren Ringmauer als keltische Pfostenschlitzmauer belegt, aber auch das Verlangen nach einer ausgedehnteren Grabung geweckt. Denn viele Fragen zur keltischen Geschichte des Berges sind noch offen.

Seit 1996 verbindet übrigens der „Keltenpfad“ mit seinen Schautafeln die historischen Stätten. Wanderer und Besucher finden auf dem Sattel zwischen den beiden Bergkuppen – nahe des großen Parkplatzes – erholsame Einkehr in der seit 1929 bestehenden Gaststätte „Waldschenke“.

Der Heiligenberg als „Heiliger Ort“

Eines der besonderen Merkmale des Heiligenberges ist, dass wir dort eine Kontinuität eines Bergheiligtums mindestens seit der keltischen Besiedelung bis zum Ende der Klosterzeit – wenn auch mit kurzen Unterbrechungen – annehmen können. Davon ausgehend ist die Frage zu prüfen, ob es ein besonderes religiöses Thema war, das die Heiligtümer der verschiedenen Kulturepochen miteinander verbunden hat, ein inhaltliches Kontinuum also.

Der archäologisch älteste Nachweis für ein Heiligtum auf dem Heiligenberg ist durch die Reste der keltischen Besiedlung zwischen dem 5. und 3. vorchristlichen Jahrhundert gegeben. Nachdem der in Bergheim gefundene Keltenkopf analog der Monumentalfigur am Glauberg als Teil einer Grabfigur eines keltischen „Fürsten“ gedeutet werden konnte, konnte darauf geschlossen werden, dass es auf dem hinteren Gipfel des Heiligenberges im 5. Jahrhundert einen „Fürstensitz“ gegeben hatte. Dass zu einem Fürstensitz auch ein wie auch immer gestaltetes Heiligtum gehörte, ist sicher. Immerhin gibt es auf dem Heiligenberg dafür auch 2 archäologische Hinweise:

  • Als bei den Ausgrabungen der 1980er Jahre das Areal des römischen Merkurtempels freigelegt wurde, stießen die Archäologen auf eine ca. 80 cm tiefe vorgeschichtliche Grube mit Knochen- und anderen Resten, die sich im Mittelpunkt des Tempels – also unter der Götterstatue des Mercurius – (und der späteren Basilika) befand. Dies könnte ein Hinweis auf das angenommene keltische Heiligtum auf dem Gipfel sein, das von den Römern anscheinend sorgsam in ihr Heiligtum übernommen wurde, was darauf schließen lässt, dass es von der Bevölkerung um den Heiligenberg auch nach der Aufgabe der keltischen Besiedlung auf dem Berg weiter genutzt wurde.
  • Wenn auch nach wie vor ungeklärt ist, wer wann aus welchen Gründen das Heidenloch angelegt hat, gibt es doch gute Gründe anzunehmen, dass es die Kelten waren, zumal nur sie die „manpower“ für ein so großes Projekt hatten und sich diese Grube am äußersten Südwestrand des Bezirkes der inneren Ringmauer befand. Da aber aus geologischen Gründen (Wasseradern im Berg sowie Beschaffenheit des Bundsandsteins) eine Brunnen- oder Zisternenanlage unwahrscheinlich ist – diesbezügliche Versuche z.B. der Römer, das Heidenloch als solche zu nutzen, blieben ohne Erfolg – , bleibt nur die Interpretation als Opfergrube. Wenn das so war, war es sinnvoll, sie wegen etwaigen Verwesungsgeruches der geopferten Tiere an den Rand der Siedlung zu legen. Opfergruben sind in verschiedenen keltischen heiligen Bezirken („Nemeton“) in Südwestdeutschland gefunden worden, allerdings nicht tiefer als 35 m. Sie stellten in der religiösen Vorstellung der Kelten einen Ort dar, der dem Übergang vom Leben in eine andere („Unter-„)Welt symbolisierte und offenbar einer keltischen Erdgottheit gewidmet war, so Dirk Krauße, Landesarchäologe Baden-Württembergs in einem ZDF-Film über keltische Funde nahe der Heuneburg.

In römischer Zeit wurde hier neben anderen römischen Göttern in erster Linie Merkur verehrt, dessen Tempel der Mittelpunkt des heiligen Bezirkes der Römer war. Merkur war unter den Kelten besonders beliebt, wie auch schon von Caesar in Buch 6 seines De Bello Gallico erwähnt. Er wurde oft mit dem keltischen Gott Teutates identifiziert, allerdings gibt es ein Votivtäfelchen am Heiligenberg, das Mercurius mit dem relativ unbekannten keltischen linksrheinischen Gott Visucius gleichsetzt. Daneben gibt es noch die Nennung Merkurs als „Mercurius Cimbrianus“, also als germanischer Gott, der hier vor allem mit Odin (bzw. Wotan) gleichgesetzt wurde. Wie wir wissen, ermöglichte das die „interpretatio romana“, die die Gleichsetzung des römischen Götterolymp mit den jeweiligen Provinzgöttern als integrative Religionspolitik förderte.
Nach dem Ende der römischen und alamannischen Anwesenheit wird in merowingisch/fränkischer Zeit der heidnische Tempel christianisiert und, wie wir annehmen können, dem Erzengel Michael geweiht (das Patrozinium des Michael ist erst ab 890 gesichert). Nun folgt eben der Erzengel Michael gerne an vergleichbaren Plätzen auf den römischen Gott Merkur.

Und tatsächlich verbindet die Beiden einiges. Merkur kennen wir meist als Gott der Händler und Diebe. Aber er ist auch ein geflügelter Götterbote, und die Griechen bezeichneten ihren Hermes als „Psychpombós“, d.h. als Seelenbegleiter, der die Verstorbenen zum Fluss Styx geleitet, nach dessen Überquerung sie in den Hades, die Unterwelt gelangen.

Hermes als Seelengeleiter

Hermes als Seelengeleiter

Ebenso hat Michael, auch ein geflügelter Gottesbote, der Archangelos, die Eigenschaft eines Seelenbegleiters, dazu ist er der Seelenwäger beim jüngsten Gericht.

St.Michael als Seelengeleiter (Griechisch-orthodoxe Ikone aus Kreta)

St.Michael als Seelengeleiter (Griechisch-orthodoxe Ikone aus Kreta)

Erwähnt werden sollte auch, dass in der Michaelbasilika des 10. Jahrhunderts ein Reliquienschrein oder -grab sich in der Mitte des Mittelschiffes befand, also gerade an der Stelle, wo sich die vorrömische Opfergrube sowie das Götterbild Merkurs befunden hatte. Und im Anschluss an diese Grube war schon  im 5./6. Jahrhundert ein Zentralgrab angelegt worden, um das andere Gräber gruppiert wurden. Die hier Bestatteten wurde wohl von den Lorscher Mönchen als frühe Glaubenszeugen verehrt.

Darüber hinaus gilt, dass der Heiligenberg zu verschiedenen Zeiten von der Urnenfelder Zeit bis zum Ende der Klosterzeit ein beliebter Bestattungsplatz war. Nicht ein Friedhof, aber wer es sich aus verschiedenen Gründen leisten konnte, ließ sich hier „oben“ an diesem heiligen Ort zwischen Himmel und Erde mit der großen Weitsicht gerne zur letzten Ruhe betten. Das gilt wohl nicht für die Kelten- und die Römerzeit, aber umso mehr für die merowingisch/fränkische Zeit, auch die Mönche des späteren Klosters fanden hier ihre letzte Ruhestätte. Und es sind immer wieder auch Laien, Männer, Frauen und Kinder, die auch während der Klosterzeit hier begraben werden.

Und damit ergibt sich mindestens durch die 2 Jahrtausende von der keltischen Besiedlung bis zum Ende der Klosterzeit ein durchgehendes Thema des Heiligtums auf dem Heiligenberg: Hier war ein guter Platz für den Übergang vom diesseitigen Leben in ein wie auch immer vorgestelltes Jenseits, begleitet von einer Gottheit bzw. einem Erzengel. Hier war der Platz zwischen Himmel und Erde, ein heiliger Ort, an dem man über die kleinen Sorgen des Alltags hinausdachte und sich mit dem schwierigen Thema einer postmortalen Existenz konfrontierte. Dass schon zur Urnenfelderzeit hier oben begraben wird, lässt Spekulationen auf eine vielleicht noch ältere Tradition der Beschäftigung mit dem Jenseits auf dem Berg zu.

Eigentlich passt dazu auch ganz gut der lokale Heilige des Berges. Friedrich von Hirsau kommt auf dem Heiligenberg, so könnte man überspitzt sagen, um hier zu sterben, denn lange währt das ihm gewährte Asyl zum Schutz vor dem „Mobbing“ in seinem Hirsauer Kloster nicht, wo er wegen der sicher falschen Anschuldigung eines Ehebruchs angeklagt und als Abt abgesetzt wurde. Er lebt hier nicht mehr lange, und die erzählten wunderbaren Umstände seines Sterbens machen ihn zum verehrten Heiligen der Region und zum Ziel von Wallfahrten ins Kloster und in die Ostkrypta. Und diese enthält mehr als eine Reliquie, sie enthält das in den Felsen eingelassene Grab Friederichs. Ein Grab als Ziel der Wallfahrt, wie passend zur Geschichte des Berges!

Das Grab des als heilig verehrten Friedrich von Hirsau

Das Grab des als heilig verehrten Friedrich von Hirsau